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Transmissions

Transmissions: Mapping Communicability through Artistic and Creative Research

Running over the course of three years, this series of events will offer specific training in artistic and creative research in the areas of Fine Art, Art-Writing, Performance and Poetry.

Transmissions: Mapping Communicability through Artistic and Creative Research

From Friday 6 October

Running over the course of three years, this series of events will offer specific training in artistic and creative research in the areas of Fine Art, Art-Writing, Performance and Poetry.

The series begins with the following premise:

A requirement of research, generally speaking, is that it ‘form a distinct contribution to knowledge’. Within artistic and creative research, specifically, this is coupled with a further requirement to develop the very form whereby such a contribution can be made. In this respect, artistic and creative research complicates the basic criterion for academic research – by extension, raising philosophical questions around knowledge and judgement – through a specific emphasis on communicability.

We propose to foreground the communicability inherent in artistic and creative research, developing this as a concept and mapping its trajectory through a series of nine events, one event per academic term for the next three years.

The event series will involve an opening Roundtable discussion between CHASE researchers; a series of Public Lectures + Masterclasses delivered by national and international artists, performers and poets; and a concluding Research Banquet.

Roundtable

To open the series, researchers from Goldsmiths, Sussex and across CHASE institutions will meet to explore key concepts and discuss examples of practice.

Public Lectures

A series of Public Lectures will frame the work of national and international artists and creative practitioners as research. The lectures will be open to the public as well as to the research communities across the CHASE consortium – we will encourage a wide audience, aiming for 150-200 people per lecture.

 ‘Masterclasses’

Each Public Lecture will be followed the next day by a closed-session Masterclass where PhD Researchers from Goldsmiths, Sussex and across all CHASE institutions will be invited to engage with the work of the invited artist/creative practitioner, exploring this alongside presentations by two of the PhD Researchers themselves.

Here we will look at the ways in which what an artistic or creative work is ‘saying’ relates to how it is being ‘spoken’. Specifically, we will look at the ways in which the following are intrinsic to a work’s message:

o   aesthetics (understood as the way in which the work is perceived by the senses);

o   poetics (understood as the means whereby the work draws attention to itself as a constructed entity);

o   performance (understood as the enactment of the work and its reception in any given space and time, including its re-formatting in and for particular contexts).

In order to facilitate discussion and to ensure benefit to doctoral researchers, the Masterclasses will be capped at 20 participants.

Research Banquet

The closing event of the Research Banquet will allow us to draw together the findings of the series in a large banquet setting.

The following is a schedule of events. Details will be added as the series progresses.

Academic Year 2017-18

Term 1 - Roundtable on ‘Communicability’

Friday, 6 October, 14.00-17.00

Goldsmiths College, Deptford Town Hall (Room 109), New Cross Rd, London SE14 6AF, UK

** See below for further information about the Roundtable and to sign up.**

Term 2 - Lecture/Masterclass 1

Information forthcoming …

Term 3 - Lecture/Masterclass 2

Information forthcoming …                                 


Academic Year 2018-19

Term 1 - Lecture/Masterclass 3

Information forthcoming …

Term 2: Lecture/Masterclass 4

Information forthcoming …

Term 3: Lecture/Masterclass 5

Information forthcoming …


Academic Year 2019-20

Term 1: Lecture/Masterclass 6

Information forthcoming …

Term 2: Lecture/Masterclass 7

Information forthcoming …

Term 3: Lecture/Masterclass 8

Information forthcoming …


Academic Year 2020-21

Term 1: Research Banquet

Information forthcoming …


Funding for this event is provided by the Consortium for Humanities and the Arts South-East England (CHASE).

Spaces are limited and applications will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis through the online booking form below.

Each event will be advertised individually, with information related to each forthcoming event listed at the bottom of this page.

You must apply separately for each of the events. Applications must be received by the following deadlines:

  • Roundtable:  Deadline for application - Friday, 29 September @ 5.00pm - bookingnow closed
  • Lecture/Masterclass 1: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 2: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 3: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 4: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 5: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 6: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 7: t.b.c.
  • Lecture/Masterclass 8: t.b.c
  • Research Banquet: t.b.c.

Confirmation of a place and further information on each event will be circulated at least one week in advance.

For any queries, please contact Professor Kristen Kreider (k.kreider@gold.ac.uk).


Communicability

The Very Large Array, New Mexico.

The Very Large Array, New Mexico.

Date:  Friday, 7 October
Time:  14.00-17.00
Location:  Goldsmiths College, Deptford Town Hall (Room 109), New Cross Rd, London SE14 6AF, UK

Led by Kristen Kreider, Michael Newman, Edgar Schmitz

The Very Large Array, New Mexico.

To instigate the CHASE-sponsored event series Transmissions: Mapping Communicability through Artistic and Creative Research, we are hosting a roundtable on ‘Communicability’ at Goldsmiths.

Transmissions

We begin with the following premise:

A requirement of research, generally speaking, is that it ‘form a distinct contribution to knowledge’. Within artistic and creative research, specifically, this is coupled with a further requirement to develop the very form whereby such a contribution can be made. In this respect, artistic and creative research complicates the basic criterion for academic research – by extension, raising philosophical questions around knowledge and judgement – through a specific emphasis on communicability.

With this in mind, this series of events foregrounds the communicability inherent in artistic and creative research; develop this as a concept and map it through examples of work; ultimately, to propose this as a criterion specific to creative and artistic research.

Roundtable – Part 1: Key Concepts  

For the purposes of the roundtable, we will engage with background reading of theoretical texts in order to explore key concepts relating to communicability.

Some readings are required for the sessions, others are optional.

Reading materials can be found at the Dropbox link:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/gvbm9ced99a6s2n/AADF_KSRiHncmXwjwqHXOd_Ta?dl=0

‘The pragmatics of communication and the politics of communicability’
Please dip into the following ahead of the roundtable::

  • Dikec, Mustafa. ‘Politics of Aesthetics’. Space, Politics and Aesthetics.  Edinburgh, U of Edinburgh Press, 2015. pp. 12-39.
  • Kreider, Kristen. ‘Material Poetics and the Communication Event’. Performance Research: On Poetics, vol. 20, no. 1, 2015. pp.76-85.
  • Pierce, C.S. ‘How to Make our Ideas Clear’. The Essential Writings. Ed. Edward C. Moore. New York, NY: Prometheus Books, 1998, pp. 137-57.

‘The limit of communicability and communication of the limit’

Please read the following three texts, each dealing with a different aspect of the limit of communicability - singularity, the condition of communicability without meta-language, and noise:

  • Emmanuel Levinas, ‘Language and Proximity’ from Emmanuel Levinas, Collected Philosophical Papers (Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic, 1987), pp. 109-126.
  • Giorgio Agamben, ‘Notes on Gesture’ in Means Without End: Notes on Politics (Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2000), pp.49-60
  • Michel Serres, The Parasite, trans. Lawrence R. Scher (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007), pp. 67-70, 121-128.

 Reading these will be helpful, but is optional:

  • Walter Benjamin, ‘On Language as Such and On the Language of Man’
  • Walter Benjamin, ‘The Task of the Translator’

Here is some further reading to follow up if you are interested:

  • Stephen Croker, ‘Noises and Exceptions: Pure Mediality in Serres and Agamben’, http://www.ctheory.net/articles.aspx?id=574
  • Joseph. Libertson, Proximity: Levinas, Blanchot, Bataille, and Communication (The Hague ; Boston: M. Nijhoff, 1982).
  • Yve Lomax, Pure Means: Writing, Photographs and an Insurrection of Being (Ventnor, Isle of Wight: Copy Press, 2014).

‘infrastructure/ aggregate states/ choreography’

Set reading:

  • Keller Easterling, Extrastatecraft. The Power of Infrastructure Space, 2014(part. 'Introduction', pp.11-23)
  • Stefano Harney/ Fred Moten, Undercommons. Fugitive Planning and Black Study, 2013 (part. '5: Planning and Policy', pp. 70-82)

http://www.minorcompositions.info/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/undercommons-web.pdf

 Further reading & viewing:

Roundtable – Part 2: Key Examples

Everyone is asked to bring to the table one example of work by an artist or creative practitioner who you consider to be ‘doing research’.

Please bring your example to the table in hard copy, which may be a printed photograph, descriptive text, article, etc.

Engaging with these examples of work we will open up questions, including:

  • How do artistic and creative works understood as research cultivate new knowledge and suggest a totally new conception of what we understand by ‘knowledge’?
  • How does the knowledge produced through art and creative research incorporate aspects of tacit knowledge, non-knowledge, un-knowing or even refusal of knowledge?
  • How does this warrant the further criterion of communicability as intrinsic to art and creative research? What are the artistic, academic, philosophical, political and practical implications of this further criterion?

See the following link for more information on the event series Transmissions: Mapping Communicability through Artistic and Creative Research.

Bios

Kristen Kreider is a writer and artist. Her research stems from an interest in the poetics of thought, its materialization as form, and a concern with how artworks relate to the world. She has published poetry, essays, journal articles and a single-authored monograph entitled Poetics & Place: The Architecture of Sign, Subject and Site (IB Tauris). In collaboration with the architect James O’Leary, Kristen’s artistic practice engages with sites of architectural and cultural interest. Combining aspects of performance, installation, documentary, poetry, fiction and image-making, the work of Kreider + O’Leary exposes and interweaves the complexities of place into a fabrication of the real. Their book Falling was published by Copy Press, Field Poetics is forthcoming from MA Biblioteque, and they are currently working on a large-scale project, Un-Governable Spaces, engaging with five sites of community and resistance globally. Kristen is Professor of Fine Art and Director of the Art Research Programme at Goldsmiths College, London. (http://www.kreider-oleary.net)

 Michael Newman is Professor of Art Writing at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has published numerous essays on modern and contemporary artists, as well as thematic essays on the wound, the horizon, contingency, memory, drawing, and nonsense. He is the author of Richard Prince Untitled (couple) (2006), Jeff Wall: Works and Writings (2007), Price, Seth (2010) and “Stuart Brisley: Performing the Political Body and Eating Shit” in Stuart Brisley (2015). He is co-editor of Rewriting Conceptual Art (1999) and The State of Art Criticism (2007). The exhibitions he has curated include Tacita Dean at York University, Toronto, Revolver2 (contemporary artists) at Matt’s Gallery, London, and ‘Drawing after Bellmer in Europe, North America and Japan’ will be at The Drawing Room, London. The first volume of his selected writings, ‘I know very well…but all the same’: Essays on Artists of the Still and Moving Image is forthcoming with Ridinghouse.

Edgar Schmitz is an artist who produces escapist backdrops from film, sculpture, animation and writing, including a recent book on Hubs and Fictions edited with Sophia Hao (2016, Sterberg Press). Selected solo exhibitions include sindanao2, Himalayas Museum, Shanghai; Surplus Cameo Decor, Cooper Gallery, Dundee; extra added bonus material, FormContent, London; Liam Gillick: “Edgar Schmitz”, ICA, London (with Liam Gillick). He is currently Senior Lecturer in Art at Goldsmiths as well as Associate Researcher 2017 at netwerk center for contemporary art, Aalst (B) and one of their Unreliable Protagonists for 2017/18.


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